Tag Archives: will-to-meaning

The Boy Who Pulled My Ponytail

When I was about seven years old the boy in the desk behind me at school used to pull my ponytail. I didn’t like it. But other than jerking my head away I didn’t do anything. What do I think … Continue reading

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The Missing Ingredient

Frankl didn’t intend for logotherapy to stand on its own but to supplement other theories much the same way that the spirit cannot stand on its own without the physical body, the intellect or the emotions. The spirit is not … Continue reading

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Introduction to Logophilosophy

I’ve noticed a barrier to introducing the philosophy behind logotherapy. On one hand our orientation towards life determines how we relate to life. For the therapist our conception of a human being determines how we relate to a human being. … Continue reading

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Will to meaning

The will to pleasure sets man up as an animal. The will to power sets man up as a god. The will to meaning sets man up as a created being standing in relationship to God. Through this relationship, and … Continue reading

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Ten ways to read in between the lines of life’s meaning

(a continuation of “Life is what happens in-between the lines”) From the youngest age you can recall: Will to meaning: What stimulated your curiosity? – or – What did you always seem to be seeking again and again? Ultimate meaning: … Continue reading

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Be engaged

Logotherapy is focused on accessing the individual’s natural goodness and will to meaning. This can be translated in Jewish terms in one of the messages in the recitation of the Shema where we say “Hear O Israel the Lord our … Continue reading

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Freedom to learn

I’m revisiting a book I read a long time ago called Freedom to Learn by Carl Rogers. After a bit of browsing a few of his points and questions caught my attention. I’m not yet responding with my own thoughts … Continue reading

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